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Weeks Mills Freight House

Publication: Continental Modeller
Publication Date: December 2007



Bollinger Edgerly Scale Trains have added to their wide selection range of structures with a kit for the small freight house located in Weeks Mills, Maine, at milepost 28.2 on the 2" gauge Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington. The line closed in 1933, but a replica of this building has been constructed at the WWF museum at Alna, Maine.

The kit includes laser-cut wood parts, stripwood of various sizes, peel & stick roof shingles, plastic windows (with nicely offset upper and lower sashes), and assorted cast whitemetal details (barrels, boxes, crates, and churns) to adorn the platform.

The main board & batten walls are laser cut, guaranteeing an accurate fit. The doors are also laser cut, with the correct planked pattern; they are individual and can be positioned open if required. The laser has also been used to produce the floor, deck, and roof. The modeler must cut and fit stripwood for the door surrounds, corner trim, barge boards, and the deck edging.

The floor structure features a five by four grid of square holes for support piles, should they be necessary according to the lie of the land, and a quantity of suitable stripwood is supplied.

No glazing material is provided. The instructions occupy five sides of A4; they are thorough and helpful, illustrated with colour photos -showing the prototype, the completed model, and the process step by step. A number of minor typographical errors are evident but none mask the sense. One small point - the printed template guide lines for ensuring the shingles strips are straight are not tall enough for this roof, but they are more than wide enough and duplicates can be cut out and overlapped.

The actual strips of shingles are just the right length for the roof, which makes offsetting them so the individual shingles do not line up a little awkward. However, there are rather more strips than required so it should be possible to split the occasional row.

No guidance is given on how to treat the front edge of the roof: a fascia board and a capping stripwood would work nicely, and there should be enough stripwood spare.

No special tools are required - just a good sharp craft knife, a metal straight edge, fine sandpaper, and suitable adhesive - and assembly should present no problems, given care and a little patience. As the building is not too large or complicated it might make a good introduction to craftsman kits for the beginner.

Colours are suggested, and it is recommended that most parts be painted or stained before assembly; however, our sample was assembled unpainted to show the materials.

The original structure had the lower part of the walls a different colour, and the most difficult task may well be masking the division over the many prominent ridges of the board & batten siding.





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